Saving up to 90% time with PLC-free programming and commissioning

Guest contributor: Frank Kaufmann, Bosch Rexroth

However efficient PLC programming for complex tasks may be, it is often relatively time-consuming for simple and moderately complex automation solutions. In light of scarce internal resources, machine manufacturers are looking for ways to speed up engineering and shorten delivery times. A new solution is Sequential Motion Control SMC, a virtually universal technology function for IndraDrive servo drives. It reduces users’ programming and commissioning work by up to 90 percent compared to PLC programming.

Career portals clearly show the lack of skilled labor: in Germany alone, there are more than ten thousand vacancies for PLC programming and commissioning specialists. The situation is no better in other countries. The lack of skilled labor not only lengthens the time to market for new machines – it also makes it more difficult to develop lucrative services, for example adapting installed stations to new tasks.

If orders are delayed owing to capacity bottlenecks, this annoys customers. This makes it all the more important to come up with an alternative to complex, time-consuming PLC programming. This is where drive-based Sequential Motion Control SMC comes in. It uses the intelligence of servo drives for applications with up to six axes yet requires no external motion control system. The integrated motion control system, on-board I/Os and expandable I/O cards reduce hardware costs and make system integration easier.

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Ten automation solutions in the time it would take for one

Lean engineering offers particularly exciting opportunities for machine manufacturers as it allows them to put in place up to ten automation solutions in the time it would normally take for one. As a result, they can step up the pace instantly and ultimately increase their turnover. Independent investigations and empirical findings show that the PLC programming and commissioning work for a flying cutter takes slightly more than a man-week. With SMC, the same result can be achieved in just four man-hours.

With a single command, SMC controls complete motion sequences which the user arranges one after another. These sequences are based on a wealth of automation experience in areas ranging from wood processing to the packaging industry and can cope with simple and moderately complex tasks in a virtually universal manner. With pre-defined commands, users can achieve independent positioning axes, axis and master axis couplings, synchronous axis operation, cam profile applications and sequential movements. Applications range from handling systems, processing stations and test stands to flying cut-off. A wide range of special functions are available: With just a few lines, users can activate head cutting, parts movements, maximum lifting routines, reverse optimization, short length processing and other functions.

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90 percent faster engineering – with SMC for IndraDrive, axis couplings, synchronous axes and sequential motion sequences can be achieved much more quickly.

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With SMC, users can achieve independent positioning axes, axis and master axis couplings, synchronous axis operation, cam disc applications and sequential movements with pre-defined commands.

Eight commands replace 200 lines of PLC code

When engineering, routine tasks such as defining operating modes, diagnostics and error handling take up significant amounts of time. Up until now, these tasks which are often unpopular accounted for up to two thirds of overall programming time although they barely contribute towards the specific solution. With the SMC option, the drives are pre-configured in the factory, thus eliminating these routine tasks. Thanks to this pre-configuration, users can begin task programming and commissioning straight away.

Sequential programming also helps less experienced technicians to create automation solutions geared to particular applications quickly. A practical example: in an open PLC such as the IEC 61131-3, the programming code for a pair of flying shears is more than 200 lines long. With SMC, the user arranges eight commands one after another and then only needs to optimize the processing procedure. Users merely need to learn around 70 commands. They include complete applications and command up to six axes at the same time with one instruction. Users issue step and motion control commands, use closed-loop force and torque controls and query I/Os.

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PLC code with just eight commands reduced to 14 lines. With SMC, programming and commissioning a pair of flying shears takes less than half a day.

Optimizing variables directly

SMC includes a manual mode for setting up and referencing axes, a parameterization mode and an automatic mode for working through the programs. In automatic mode, the solutions can control up to four tasks in parallel. At the same time, a cyclic task allows statuses and diagnoses to be called up at any time. Users can therefore observe and optimize variables while the program is running.

Quick solutions for emerging markets

The level of automation in China and other emerging markets is increasing very quickly at the moment. At the same time, there is a lack of programmers with an expert knowledge of PLC in these countries. With online help, watch-listen and tools for debugging or program management, the free SMC Editor helps even technicians with little experience. If necessary, users can use ready-made templates for visualization or create their own.

Owing to increasingly short product life cycles, rapid automation is also becoming more important in mature markets. Concepts such as Bosch Rexroth’s factory of the future are highly flexible and allow the production of very small quantities – even down to a batch size of 1. In the future, end users will be able to adapt their production lines flexibly according to orders at very short intervals and will require new motion sequences and additional processing stations at short notice.

The new processing stations must also fit into connected production lines. As a result, an open system for sharing data and information with other machines and higher-level IT systems is a must. The Sercos automation bus allows real-time cross-communication – an important requirement when it comes to precise synchronization with other process movements. Via software, the user selects in the multi-Ethernet interface one of the common protocols such as Sercos, PROFINET IO, EtherNet/IP and EtherCAT as well as the safety protocols CIP Safety on Sercos, Fail Safe over EtherCat and PROFIsafe on PROFINET.

Another task which only very experienced programmers were able to cope with relates to machine safety. Rexroth’s SafeMotion reduces the time required with certified safety functions. As a result, users do not need any additional safety control system in order to meet the requirements and standards of the Machinery Directive.

Increasing turnover with existing resources

The lack of skilled labor will remain a problem for the global mechanical engineering sector in the long term. SMC is a practically oriented approach for simplifying programming and commissioning. Machine manufacturers can therefore significantly increase the number of automation solutions that they supply even without additional PLC programmers. At the same time, the available specialists can concentrate on automating more complex tasks and here too reduce the time to market considerably.

cropped-cmafh-logo-with-tagline-caps.pngCMA/Flodyne/Hydradyne is an authorized Bosch Rexroth distributor in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Northern Indiana.

In addition to distribution, we design and fabricate complete engineered systems, including hydraulic power units, electrical control panels, pneumatic panels & aluminum framing. Our advanced components and system solutions are found in a wide variety of industrial applications such as wind energy, solar energy, process control and more.

Safely Switch Off Cylinders While Transmitting Field Data

Guest contributor: Matthias Wolfer, Balluff

 

Is it possible to safely switch off cylinders while simultaneously transmitting field data and set up the system in accordance with standards? Yes!

In order to rule out a safety-critical fault between adjacent printed circuit board tracks/contact points (short circuit) according to DIN EN ISO 13849, clearance and creepage distances must be considered. One way to eliminate faults is to provide galvanic isolation by not interconnecting safety-relevant circuits/segments. This means  charge carriers from one segment cannot switch over to the other, and the separation makes it possible to connect the safety world with automation — with IO-Link. Safely switching off actuators and simultaneously collecting sensor signals reliably via IO-Link is possible with just one module. To further benefit from IO-Link and ensure safety at the same time, Balluff’s I/O module is galvanically isolated with a sensor and an actuator segment. The two circuits of the segments are not interconnected, and the actuator segment can be safely switched off without affecting the sensors. Important sensor data can still be monitoring and communicated.

The topological structure and the application of this safety function is shown in this figure as an example:

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  1. A PLC is connected to an IO-Link master module via a fieldbus system.
  2. The IO-Link master is the interface to all I/O modules (IO-Link sensor/actuator hubs) or other devices, such as IO-Link sensors. The IO-Link communication takes place via a standardized M12 connector.|
  3. Binary switching elements can be connected to the galvanically isolated sensor/actuator hub (BNI IOL-355). The four connection ports on the left correspond to the sensor segment and the four ports on the right correspond to the actuator segment. Communication of the states is done via IO-Link.
  4. The power supply for both segments takes place via a 7/8″ connection, whereby attention must be paid to potential separated routing of the sensor and actuator circuits. Both the power supply unit itself and the wiring to the IO-Link device with the two segments must also ensure external galvanic isolation. This is made possible by separating the lines with a splitter.
  5. An external safety device is required to safely interrupt the supply voltage of the actuator segment (four ports simultaneously). Thus, the module can implement safety functions up to SIL2 according to EN62061/PLd and ISO 13849.

For example, this can happen through the use of a safety relay, whereby the power supply is safely disconnected after actuation of peripheral safety devices (such as emergency stops and door switches). At the same time, the sensor segment remains active and can provide important information from the field devices.

The module can handle up to eight digital inputs and outputs. If the IO-Link connection is interrupted, the outputs assume predefined states that are retained until the IO-Link connection is restored. Once the connection is restored, this unique state of the machine can be used to continue production directly without a reference run.

An application example for the interaction of sensors and actuators in a safety environment is the pneumatic clamping device of a workpiece holder. The position feedback of the cylinders is collected by the sensor segment, while at the same time the actuator segment can be switched off safely via its separately switchable safety circuit. If the sensor side is not required for application-related reasons, galvanically isolated IO-Link modules are also available with only actuator segments (BNI IOL 252/256). An isolated shutdown can protect up to two safety areas separately.

cropped-cmafh-logo-with-tagline-caps.pngCMA/Flodyne/Hydradyne is an authorized  Balluff distributor in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Northern Indiana.

In addition to distribution, we design and fabricate complete engineered systems, including hydraulic power units, electrical control panels, pneumatic panels & aluminum framing. Our advanced components and system solutions are found in a wide variety of industrial applications such as wind energy, solar energy, process control and more.

THE LARGEST FLOW ON THE MARKET

Guest contributor: Dr. Till Deubel, Head of Development, Cartridge Valves, Bosch Rexroth

When it comes to valves, maintaining performance with an increased flow rate can be extremely good news for manufacturers. It allows them to meet the same requirements with a smaller machine size or maximize manufacturing performance with a minimized footprint. 

Our brand-new WRC-4X directional high-response cartridge valves not only meet high dynamics and flow requirements, they can also be integrated into networked environments.

As they feature integrated electronics with a multi-Ethernet interface and OCI for Drives, WRC-4X valves can be integrated into networked environments even with an analog signal input.

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Next generation thinking

Once again, we’re pleased to be moving technology forward – increasing performance and communication for hydraulic actuators with our next generation of WRC-4X directional high-response cartridge valves. These valves are more dynamic and consistently achieve flows that could previously only be met by using the next highest available size. In fact, they provide the largest flow on the market.

Integrated electronics (OBE) allow the new valve series to be networked via open interfaces with higher-level control units and Industry 4.0 environments, even when used with an analog signal input. This means that the valves are ready be integrated right away into even the most cutting edge automation concepts and can benefit from predictive maintenance.

Flexing to future challenges

Our new cartridge valve blocks are ideal for applications with high flow and dynamics requirements, such as:

  • Presses
  • Die-casting
  • Injection molding machines

Using sophisticated co-simulations with flow analyses and strength calculations, our developers have optimized channel geometries and enabled different sized valves to achieve significantly higher flow levels. This means they can consistently achieve values that would previously have only been possible by using valves the next size up.

The valves can be operated via digital and analog control signal input. In both cases, the integrated electronics (OBE) enable the valves to be seamlessly integrated into digitally networked automation environments and Industry 4.0 applications. WRC-4X valves also feature an open interface that enables communication with a range of programs. So machine manufacturers and operators can incorporate the valves into condition monitoring systems and benefit from predictive maintenance.

Learn more:  https://www.boschrexroth.com/en/xc/products/product-groups/industrial-hydraulics/index

cropped-cmafh-logo-with-tagline-caps.pngCMA/Flodyne/Hydradyne is an authorized Bosch Rexroth distributor in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Northern Indiana.

In addition to distribution, we design and fabricate complete engineered systems, including hydraulic power units, electrical control panels, pneumatic panels & aluminum framing. Our advanced components and system solutions are found in a wide variety of industrial applications such as wind energy, solar energy, process control and more.

Safety Over IO-Link Helps Enable Human-Robot Collaboration

Guest Contributor: Tom Knauer, Balluff

Safety Over IO-Link makes it easier to align a robot’s restricted and safeguarded spaces, simplifies creation of more dynamic safety zones and allows creation of “layers” of sensors around a robot work area.

For the past several years, “collaboration” has been a hot topic in robotics.  The idea is that humans and robots can work closely together, in a safe and productive manner.  Changes in technology and standards have created the environment for this close cooperation. These standards call out four collaborative modes of operation: Power & Force Limiting, Hand Guiding, Safety Rated Monitored Stop, and Speed & Separation Monitoring (these are defined in ISO/TS 15066).

Power & Force Limiting

Power & Force Limiting is what many people refer to when speaking about Collaborative Robots, and it applies to robots such as Baxter from Rethink Robotics and the UR series made by Universal Robots.  While the growth in this segment has been fast, there are projections that traditional robots will continue to make up 2/3 of the market through 2025, which means that many users will want to improve their traditional robot solutions to “collaborate”.

Hand Guiding

Hand guiding is the least commonly applied mode, it is used for very specific applications such as power assist (one example is loading spare tires into a new car). It generally requires special equipment mounted on the robot to facilitate the guiding function.

Safety Rated Monitored Stop and Speed & Separation Monitoring

Safety Rated Monitored Stop and Speed & Separation Monitoring are especially interesting for traditional robots, and require safety sensors and controls to be implemented.  Customers wanting closer human-robot collaboration using traditional robots will need devices such as safety laser scanners, safety position sensors, safety PLCs and even safety networks – this is where Safety Over IO-Link can enable collaborative applications.

SAfety

Many of IO-Link’s well-known features also provide advantages for traditional robot builders and users:

1) Faster & cheaper integration/startup through reduction in cabling, standardized connectors/cables/sensors and device parameterization.

2) Better connection between sensors and controllers supports robot supplier implementation of IIoT and improved collaboration by making it easier to gather process, device and event data – this allows improved productivity/uptime, better troubleshooting, safer machines, preventative maintenance, etc.

3) Easier alignment of the robot’s restricted and safeguarded spaces, simplifying creation of more dynamic safety zones to support closer human-robot collaboration.

The third item is especially relevant in enabling collaborative operation of traditional robots.  The updated standards allow the creation of a “shared workspace” for the robot and human, and how they interact in this space depends on the collaborative mode.  At a simple level, Safety Rated Monitored Stop and Speed & Separation Monitoringrequire this “shared workspace” to be monitored, this is generally accomplished using a “restricted space” and a “safeguarded space.”  These “spaces” must be monitored using many sensors, both inside and outside the robot.

First, the robot’s “restricted space” is set up to limit the robot’s motion to a specific 3-dimensional volume.  In the past, this was set up through hard stops, limit switches or sensors, more recently the ANSI RIA R15.06 robot standard was updated to allow this to be done in software through safety-rated soft axis and space limiting.  Most robot suppliers offer a software tool such as “Safe Move” or Dual Check Safety” to allow the robot to monitor its own position and confirm it is where it is supposed to be.  This feature requires safe position feedback and many sensors built into the robot.  This space can change dynamically with the robot’s program, allowing more flexibility to safely move the robot and assure its location.

Second, a safeguarded space must be defined and monitored.  This is monitored using safety rated sensors to track the position of people and equipment around the robot and send stop (and in some cases warning) signals to the safety controller and robot.  Safety Over IO-Link helps connect and manage the safety devices, and quickly send their signals to the control system.

In the past, integrating a robot with safety meant wiring many safety sensors with long cable runs and many terminations back to a central cabinet.  This was a time consuming, labor intensive process with risk of miswiring or broken cables.  IO-Link significantly reduces the cost, speed and length of connections due to use of standard cables and connectors, and the network approach.  It is also much simpler for customers to change their layout using the network, master & hub approach.

Customers wanting collaborative capability in traditional robots will find that Safety Over IO-Link can significantly simplify and reduce the cost of the process of integrating the many advanced safety sensors into the application.

To learn more, visit www.balluff.com.

cropped-cmafh-logo-with-tagline-caps.pngCMA/Flodyne/Hydradyne is an authorized  Balluff distributor in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Northern Indiana.

In addition to distribution, we design and fabricate complete engineered systems, including hydraulic power units, electrical control panels, pneumatic panels & aluminum framing. Our advanced components and system solutions are found in a wide variety of industrial applications such as wind energy, solar energy, process control and more.

Robot Collaborative Operation

Guest contributor: Tom Knauer, Balluff

In previous blogs, we discussed how “Safety Over IO-Link Helps Enable Human-Robot Collaboration” and “Safety & Productivity”. We’ll build on these blogs and dive more deeply into two robot collaborative operating modes: Safety-Rated Monitored Stop (SRMS) and Speed & Separation Monitoring (SSM).

Human-Robot Collaboration

Human-robot collaboration has received a lot of attention in the media, yet there is still confusion about the meaning and benefits of various types of collaboration. In a previous blog we briefly discussed the four collaborative modes defined by the global standard ISO/TS 15066. The most well-known mode is “power & force limiting”, which includes robots made by Universal Robots and Rethink. As the name implies, these robots are designed with limited power and force (and other ergonomic factors) to avoid injury or damage, but they are also slower, less precise and less powerful than traditional robots, reducing their usefulness in many common applications.

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The safety-rated monitored stop (SRMS) and speed & separation monitoring (SSM) modes are very interesting because they allow larger, more powerful, traditional robots to be used collaboratively — though in a different manner than power & force limited robots. The updated standards allow the creation of a shared workspace for the robot and human and define how they may interact in this space. Both SRMS and SSM require this shared workspace to be monitored using advanced safety sensors and software, which create a restricted space and a safeguarded space. With SRMS, the robot stops before the operator enters the collaborative workspace — this requires a safety sensor to detect the operator. Similarly, in SSM the goal is to control the separation distance between the human and robot, but it can be dynamic, rather than static as in SRMS. The SRMS separation distance can never be less than the protective distance and this requires sensors to verify the separation.

Spaces

The robot’s restricted space is a 3-dimensional area created to limit where the robot can operate. In the past this was done through limit switches, hard stops or sensors such as Balluff’s BNS; now the standards have been updated to allow this to be done in software with internal robot feedback that can dynamically change to adapt to the robot’s programmed operation. The robot controller can now restrict the robot’s motion to a specific envelope and monitor its actual position against its programmed position within this envelope using software tools such as Safe Move or Dual Check Safety.

The safeguarded space is defined and monitored using safety sensors. The robot might know and assure its own safe position within the restricted space, but it doesn’t know whether or not a person or obstruction is in this space, therefore a safeguarded space needs to be created using safety sensors. Advanced sensors not only detect people or obstructions, but can also actively track their position around the robot and send warning or stop signals to the safety controller and robot. Safety laser scanners, 3D safety cameras and other safety sensors can create zones, which can also be dynamically switched depending on the operating state of the robot or machine.

Closely coordinating the restricted space and safeguarded space creates a flexible and highly productive system. The robot can operate in one zone, while an operator loads/unloads in a different zone. The robot sensors monitor the restricted space while the safety sensors monitor the safeguarded space – and when the robot moves to the next phase of operation, these can dynamically switch to new zones. Warning zones can also be defined to cause the robot can slow down if someone starts to approach too closely and then stop if the person comes too close.

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System Linkages

Linking the restricted space and safeguarded space to create an effective, closely coordinated human-robot SSM/SRMS collaborative system requires several elements: a high performance robot and controller with advanced software (e.g. Safe Move), a fieldbus and a variety of built-in and external sensors (standard and safety).

Significant growth in robot collaborative applications utilizing safety-rated monitored stop (SRMS) and speed & separation monitoring (SSM) will occur as robot users strive to improve productivity and safety of traditional robot systems – especially in applications requiring faster speed, higher force and more precision than that offered by power & force limited robots.

To learn more visit www.balluff.com

cropped-cmafh-logo-with-tagline-caps.pngCMA/Flodyne/Hydradyne is an authorized  Balluff distributor in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Northern Indiana.

In addition to distribution, we design and fabricate complete engineered systems, including hydraulic power units, electrical control panels, pneumatic panels & aluminum framing. Our advanced components and system solutions are found in a wide variety of industrial applications such as wind energy, solar energy, process control and more.

Changing the Paradigm from Safety vs. Productivity to Safety & Productivity

Guest Contributor: Tom Knauer, Balluff

In a previous blog, we discussed how “Safety Over IO-Link Helps Enable Human-Robot Collaboration”. It was a fairly narrow discussion of collaborative robot modes and how sensors and networks can make it easier to implement these modes and applications. This new blog takes a broader look at the critical role safety plays in the intersection between the machine and the user.

In the past, the machine guarding philosophy was to completely separate the human from the machine or robot.  Unfortunately, this resulted in the paradigm of “safety vs. productivity” — you either had safety or productivity, but you couldn’t have both. This paradigm is now shifting to “safety & productivity”, driven by a combination of updated standards and new technologies which allow closer human-machine interaction and new modes of collaborative operation.

Tom_Safety1.pngThe typical machine/robot guarding scheme of the past used fences or hard guards to separate the human from the machine.  Doors were controlled with safety interlock switches, which required the machine to stop on access, such as to load/unload parts or to perform maintenance or service, and this reduced productivity.  It was also not 100% effective because workers inside a machine area or work cell might not be detected if another worker restarted the stopped machine.  Other drawbacks included the cost of space, guarding, installation, and difficultly changing the work cell layout once hard guarding had been installed.

We’ve now come to an era when our technology and standards allow improved human access to the machine and robot cell.  We’re starting to think about the human working near or even with the machine/robot. The robot and machinery standards have undergone several changes in recent years and now allow new modes of operation.  These have combined with new safety technologies to create a wave of robot and automation suppliers offering new robots, controllers, safety and other accessories.

Standards
Machine and robot safety standards have undergone rapid change in recent years. Standard IEC 61508, and the related machinery standards EN/ISO 13849-1 and EN/IEC 62061, take a functional approach to safety and define new safety performance levels. This means they focus more on the functions needed to reduce each risk and the level of performance required for each function, and less on selection of safety components. These standards helped define, and made it simpler and more beneficial, to apply safety PLCs and advanced safety components. There have also been developments in standards related to safe motion (61800-5-2) which now allow more flexible modes of motion under closely controlled conditions. And the robot standards (10218, ANSI RIA 15.06, TS15066) have made major advances to allow safety-rated soft axes, space limiting and collaborative modes of operation.

Technology
On the technology side, innovations in sensors, controllers and drives have changed the way humans interact with machines and enabled much closer, more coordinated and safer operation. Advanced sensors, such as safety laser scanners and 3D safety cameras, allow creation of work cells with zones, which makes it possible for an operator to be allowed in one zone while the robot performs tasks in a different zone nearby. Controllers now integrate PLC, safety, motion control and other functions, allowing fast and precise control of the process. And drives/motion systems now operate in various modes which can limit speed, torque, direction, etc. in certain modes or if someone is detected nearby.

Sensors and Networks
The monitoring of these robots, machines and “spaces” requires many standard and safety sensors, both inside and outside the machine or robot. But having a lot of sensors does not necessarily allow the shift from “productivity vs. safety” to “productivity & safety” — this requires a closely coordinated and integrated system, including the ability to monitor and link the “restricted space” and “safeguarded space.” This is where field busses and device-level networks can enable tight integration of devices with the control system. IO-Link masters and Safety Over IO-Link hubs allow the connection of a large number of devices to higher level field busses (ProfiNet/ProfiSafe) with effortless device connection using off-the-shelf, non-shielded cables and connectors.

Balluff offers a wide range of solutions for robot and machine monitoring, including a broad safety device portfolio which includes safety light curtains, safety switches, inductive safety sensors, an emergency stop device and a safety hub. Our sensors and networks support the shift to include safety without sacrificing productivity.

To learn more about Safety over IO-Link, visit www.balluff.com

cropped-cmafh-logo-with-tagline-caps.pngCMA/Flodyne/Hydradyne is an authorized  Balluff distributor in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Northern Indiana.

In addition to distribution, we design and fabricate complete engineered systems, including hydraulic power units, electrical control panels, pneumatic panels & aluminum framing. Our advanced components and system solutions are found in a wide variety of industrial applications such as wind energy, solar energy, process control and more.

How do I justify an IIoT investment?

Guest contributor: Will Healy III, Balluff

Many engineers and managers I meet with when presenting at conferences on Smart Manufacturing ask some version of the question: “How can we justify the extra cost of Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)?” or “How do I convince management that we need an Industry 4.0 project?” This is absolutely a fair and tough question that needs to be answered; without buy-in from management and proper budget allocation, you can’t move forward. While an investment in IIoT can deliver major payoffs, the best justification really depends on your boss.

I have seen three strong arguments that can be adapted to a variety of management styles and motivations.

1) Showing a ROI through Reducing Downtime

“Show me the money!” I think everyone has a manager with this expectation. It may seem like a daunting task to calculate or capture this information, but by using a team, knowing your KPIs and applying anecdotal feedback, you can get a good initial picture of the ROI that an IIoT project will bring to the organization. Many people have shared with me that their initial project’s ROI has “funded the next project.” There is a really great article from MetalForming Magazine that discusses how exactly to do this with the tables and forms they used at ODM Tool & Manufacturing.

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2) Corporate Goals for Productivity and Utilization

We can be successful getting support for a project when we link corporate goals to project goals. Smart Industry publishes a research project each year that investigates trends in the manufacturing space in regards to digital transformation initiatives. This report cites that the three top benefits manufacturers are seeing are: improving worker productivity (3rd 2016), reducing costs (1st 2016) and optimizing asset utilization (2nd 2016). These goals are driving investments and showing actual results for manufacturers both large and small. However, the report also revealed that more than half of manufacturers cite workforce skills-gap issues as their largest roadblock and this is, I believe, why we saw improving worker productivity move to the top spot. We must bring efficiency and effectiveness to the people we have.

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3) Your Competitors are Investing in IIoT!

If you have a boss that worries about falling behind, this can be a motivating argument. Control Engineering recently published a study of manufacturers and how they are investing in IIoT technologies. The largest investments are coming with sensors, connectivity and data analytics. But what is most shocking is that on average IIoT budgets are $328,160, with 18% budgeting more than a half-million dollars. If you want to keep up with the rapid pace of change in the global market, an investment in IIoT is a requirement to remain competitive.

If you are looking for support and partnership on your IIoT projects, we are experienced at utilizing IO-Link, smart sensors and RFID to enable Industry 4.0 and Smart Manufacturing projects.

cropped-cmafh-logo-with-tagline-caps.pngCMA/Flodyne/Hydradyne is an authorized  Balluff distributor in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Northern Indiana.