Factory of the Future

Time is money: snappy automation of testing machines

Guest contributor: Andreas Sokoll, Bosch Rexroth

Usefully combining automation and IT is not only typical of Industry 4.0. In the engineering of measuring and testing machines, open interfaces also unleash great potential for efficiency. With the aid of National Instruments’ LabVIEW graphic programming environment and Open Core Engineering, they can now be modelled and automated in an integrated manner without creating a separate PLC code. The effect: a significantly quicker time to market!

Why complicate things if they can be actually be done simply

The idea of precisely modeling customer-specific measuring and testing machines without having to acquire and coordinate an additional PLC programmer is very attractive to many manufacturers. That’s because, until now, they had to program I/O queries and axis motions separately and transfer them into a joint machine program throughout all the development phases. An irksome and time-consuming task, which introduces additional sources of errors. However, this cost and quality-related factor can be minimized if the development environment communicates directly with the control core.

Modeling measuring and testing machines without additional PLC programming: in National Instruments’ LabVIEW programming environment, manufacturers can execute the motion sequences as well as measuring and testing tasks. The Open Core Interface acts as an open interface between the control system and the PC.

Parameterizing instead of programming

National Instruments’ LabVIEW graphic programming environment, which is widely used in the measuring and testing machines field, satisfies this requirement by supporting Bosch Rexroth’s Open Core Interface. Development engineers therefore get direct access to the control functions via their usual interface. Device drivers and functions can consequently be quickly and simply selected as graphic modules (Virtual Instruments) and then only need to be parameterized. This also speeds up commissioning. This is because, in addition to the measuring and testing applications, the full machine workflow can now be mapped in LabVIEW, and consequently in a joint project. There’s no need for the PLC code to be written in parallel and continually coordinated.

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Reduced engineering workload: Since LabVIEW supports Bosch Rexroth’s Open Core Interface, machine developers no longer have to work in two environments. The axis motions can also now be produced directly in LabVIEW.

Over 550 VIs to be parameterized

With its Open Core Interface, Bosch Rexroth has established the basis for not only the graphic LabVIEW language but also other modern high-level languages, software solutions from the simulation and model-based engineering fields, and open i4.0 standards such as OPC-UA being able to access control functions directly. The seamless integration in the respective programming environment is achieved by using a software development kit (SDK). In the case of LabVIEW, it contains more than 550 Virtual Instruments (VIs). They control the connection set up (ApiLib), access to direct motion commands (MotionLib), and access to the control system (SytemLib) or the drive and control parameters (ParameterLib) among other things. They are clearly structured in function libraries and they can be simply dragged & dropped into the project and then parameterized.

Motion PLC, drive and control functions: The LabVIEW SDK contains eight libraries with over 550 additional Virtual Instruments.

Fully fledged HMI for M2M communication

Both the “front panel” and “block diagram” programming windows that are typical of LabIEW now form a fully fledged user interface for man-machine communication. The block diagram shows the flow logic in the form of VIs and links, and all the control and display elements appear in the front panel, e.g. buttons, switches or graphical displays. So direct operation of the machine is also possible. For instance, in order to move an axis, the programmer simply activates the corresponding VI. The SDK provides numerous example projects illustrating the initial steps. The HMI templates that they contain can be quickly adapted to the respective requirements.

BlockdiagrammSimple block diagram: In this example, the logically linked Virtual Instruments read a value from the control unit.

Force measurement practical example

Force measurements are by far the most common form of test task. Including handling tasks, an estimated 90 to 95 percent of all measuring and testing tasks can in practice be carried out just by using LabVIEW. Here’s an example of the monitoring of a joining process:

A DIN 625 industrial bearing is to be pressed into a tolerance ring in a controlled manner. In order to control the linear axis motion, measure the pressing force and compare it with the tolerance range, the programmer divides the project into five steps: Connect, move (axes into position), start force control and measuring, measurement completed, and retract axis. The programming takes place purely in LabVIEW with the aid of self-explanatory VIs such as “Standstill”, “MoveVelocity”, “Continuous Motion” or “Stop”. The VIs are linked by connections in the graphical user interface and are activated and deactivated via target and transfer values such as “TRUE” and “FALSE”.

HMIQuick access to the desired operating interfaces: The SDK for LabVIEW comes with lots of example projects in which the HMI can be quickly and easily adjusted.

Complete control set from a single source

In addition to pure modeling and programming in LabVIEW, as a system manufacturer Bosch Rexroth provides even more ways of increasing engineering efficiency. In the practical example shown for instance, the press-fit procedure is carried out via an energy-efficient electromechanical cylinder (EMC) with an integrated force sensor and drive. In combination with an IndraControl XM control this produces a fast, higher-level control loop in which the mechanical and electrical components work together optimally with short cycle times of 250 µs. The test system is quick to set up so it can precisely control the force moments which arise, run at constant speeds and position the work piece in a highly dynamic, flexible and precise manner depending on the requirements. A Bosch Rexroth linear motion technology tolerance ring is used as a frictionally engaged connection element for the insertion of the bearing.

Quicker to market due to large time savings

With the aid of LabVIEW and the Open Core Interface technology, together with Bosch Rexroth’s modern automation solutions, precise movements can be carried out in measuring and testing machines even without any PLC programming – including interfaces, handshakes and synchronization. For users this results in an enormous saving of time, especially since troubleshooting can also concentrate on one instead of two programming environments. This considerable time saving enables manufacturers of measuring and testing machines to bring innovative and complex products to market much more quickly and also inexpensively than before – but without compromising on quality.

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CMA/Flodyne/Hydradyne is an authorized Bosch Rexroth distributor in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Northern Indiana.

In addition to distribution, we design and fabricate complete engineered systems, including hydraulic power units, electrical control panels, pneumatic panels & aluminum framing. Our advanced components and system solutions are found in a wide variety of industrial applications such as wind energy, solar energy, process control and more.

The digital twin is the key to the Factory of the Future – Part II

Guest Contributor: Hans Michael Krause, Bosch Rexoth
The modular assembly line of Dassault Systèmes and Bosch Rexroth presented at the Hannover Messe is the result of a change in perspective. Planning production processes coming from the product, instead of the machines – that is what the digital twin can put into effect. Marketplaces for digital twins, IoT Gateway software and open standards will mark the route into the factory of the future.

The demo assembly line from Bosch Rexroth shows how digital twins completely reverse the logic of production, if you think of the Factory of the Future. It is no longer the machines that determine the processes, but the products. A customer’s order automatically leads to the creation of a digital twin. This is connected, for example via an RFID chip as a reference to the blank to inform the machines later about the respective processing steps. As a crucial precondition for this evolution, Bosch Rexroth has already created behavioral models for many automation components, which are available on request for systems engineering. As part of the online configuration, customers already receive the CAD models of the components in the appropriate data format automatically.

Next evolutionary step: Marketplaces for digital twins

In a future scenario that is interesting for mechanical engineers, digital twins could be made available from automation components but also via a marketplace in order to bring them into the simulation environment with a single click. As a result, the OEMs could parameterize the automation immediately, test it and put the entire model into virtual operation quickly and safely. In addition, the marketplace could become a PLM platform, where all digital twins for current and past solutions are available. To prepare for this scenario, Bosch Rexroth is currently seeking a dialog with its customers in order to jointly define the exact requirements for the simulation models.

Pioneering: IoT Gateway software and open standards

In order to achieve continuous improvements in production using the digital twin, the real operating data from the assembly line can be compared with its simulation. This allows the quality of the manufacturing process to be monitored in real time and the maintenance to be modeled and optimized based on the current condition. The assembly line shown at the Hannover Messe also depicts the current state of the art in this respect. The IoT Gateway software from Bosch Rexroth, which is installed on a pocket-sized box PC, collects data from the controller via the Industry 4.0 standard OPC UA and transfers it to a higher-level IT system for visualization and analysis using 5G technology. With regard to the investment security of IoT solutions, Bosch Rexroth consistently relies on open standards such as OPC UA.

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In future, it is no longer the machines that determine the processes, but the products.

Important stage on the way to the Factory of the Future

Dassault Systèmes’ and Bosch Rexroth’s partnership is a powerful testament to the competitive advantages that machine builders and end users derive from a seamless workflow, from virtual engineering to intelligent automation. The digital twin of the demonstration line not only forms the basis for the fastest possible start-up, but also for the quickest possible production changeover and easy continuous process optimization with the help of IoT services. The close partnership of both companies is another stage win along the way to the Factory of the Future.

For more information about the collaboration with Dassault Systèmes and the road to the factory of the future, please read our blog post “With the digital Twin to the Factory of the Future”.

With Digital Twin to the Factory of the Future – Part I

Guest contributor: Hans Michael Krause, Bosch Rexroth

Bosch Rexroth and Dassault Systèmes will use a modular assembly line to show how the Factory of the Future can be efficiently planned, implemented and continuously improved using digital twins. The key ingredients for this recipe for success: model-based systems engineering, intelligent controls and drives with open interfaces, and continuous improvement through IoT services.

Manufacturers of complex products and machines face the challenge of meeting the most diverse requirements in even shorter development cycles. With a demonstration assembly line, Dassault Systèmes and Bosch Rexroth will show at the Hannover Messe how time-to-market can be shortened with the greatest possible flexibility if production and product engineering seamlessly mesh on the data side. In addition, the turnkey assembly line highlights the added value that machine builders and end users can generate in conjunction with IoT services. The cornerstone of all this is the ‘digital twin’, a realistic depiction of product, production and performance.

 

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At the Hannover Messe, Bosch Rexroth and Dassault Systèmes will demonstrate the seamless and profitable interaction of line and product engineering.

“Single source of truth” for the product, production and performance

Dassault Systèmes integrates the sample project from Bosch Rexroth into the integrated engineering workflows of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, which provides a central source of information for designers, electricians and programmers. All platform functions for virtual engineering access a common database. For example, the simulation software receives direct access to the design data from the CAD program. In addition, it enables visualization in real time, so that visitors to the Bosch Rexroth booth can observe the 3D model of the demo line connected with the real object in real-time via sensors.

Shortened initial start-up through model-based engineering

The demo assembly line has a modular structure and is based on intelligent, decentralized automation components that are networked horizontally and vertically via open standards. The product that is assembled on the assembly line, the SCD – Sense Connect Detect sensor introduced by Bosch Rexroth, controls itself along the line using an RFID identifier. As in previous projects, such as the WestRock packaging machine, this system has also been developed, put into virtual operation and implemented in a very short time using models in the framework of Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCE platform. In addition to the CAD data, the behavioral models from the automation also flowed into the digital twin.

DC-AE_SMP4_Dassault_AE_Demonstrator_4-768x898The assembly line at the Hannover Messe.

Collaboration between production and product engineering

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform also acts as an interface to the end user. If the user also depicts a product using a digital twin, the system can adjust to their requirements within a short time. An example: a manufacturer of construction vehicles wants to use the SCD sensor in a future excavator to measure vibrations from the hydraulic pump. He uses the sensor model in the virtual prototype of the excavator and defines a required housing modification. Bosch Rexroth then creates a new digital twin, inserts it into the virtual line model and validates the production capability in the simulation environment. In the same way as in this example, machine builders can use their digital twins to test in advance how new variants affect space requirements, stability, geometry, storage life or transport. In addition, the simulation also exposes critical areas for product quality, thereby reducing the risk of product recalls.

Economical production of batch sizes of 1

The close interlinking of product, production and performance via digital twins also allows for much more flexibility in production. This aspect is also illustrated by the joint demo project from Bosch Rexroth and Dassault Systèmes. To economically produce different sensor variants in small quantities down to a batch size of 1, Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCE platform works with the system via its MES functions. It transmits the jobs individually to the assembly line via the OPC UA interface, and from there receives the production and quality data for each manufactured SCD sensor.

Dassault Systèmes’ and Bosch Rexroth’s partnership is a powerful testament to the competitive advantages that machine builders and end users derive from a seamless workflow, from virtual engineering to intelligent automation.

The digital twin is the key to the Factory of the FuturePart II  Blog Continued here:

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CMA/Flodyne/Hydradyne is an authorized Bosch Rexroth distributor in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Northern Indiana.

In addition to distribution, we design and fabricate complete engineered systems, including hydraulic power units, electrical control panels, pneumatic panels & aluminum framing. Our advanced components and system solutions are found in a wide variety of industrial applications such as wind energy, solar energy, process control and more.